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ERIC Number: ED550870
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 142
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2679-9953-5
ISSN: N/A
Child Teacher Relationship Training (CTRT) with Children Exhibiting Disruptive Behavior: Effects on Teachers' Ability to Provide Emotional and Relational Support to Students and on Student-Teachers Relationship Stress
Pronchenko-Jain, Yulia
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of North Texas
This study investigated the impact of child teacher relationship training (CTRT) on teachers' ability to provide emotional support in the classroom, teachers' use of relationship-building skills, and teachers' level of stress related to the student-child relationship. Teachers and aides from one Head Start school were randomly assigned to the experimental group CTRT (n = 11) or an active control Conscious Discipline group (CD; n = 12). Overall, 21 females, 11 (CTRT) and 11 (CD), and one male (CD) participated in the study. Participating teachers and aides identified themselves as the following: 13 Hispanic/Latino, 5 Black American, and 5 European American. Teachers and aides identified children with clinical levels of disruptive behavior problems for the purpose of selecting children of focus for the study. The children's mean age was 3.63 for CTRT group and 3.36 for CD group. Overall, 9 females, 2 (CTRT) and 7 (CD), and 10 males, 6 (CTRT) and 4 (CD) participated in the study. Teachers reported children's ethnicity: 13 Hispanic/Latino, 5 African American, and 1 other. A two-factor (Treatment x Group) repeated measures split plot ANOVA was utilized to analyze the data with an alpha level of 0.05. According to objective raters blinded to the study using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) and the Child Teacher Relationship Skills Checklist (CTRT-SC) and teacher reports using Index of Teaching Stress (ITS), results revealed a statistically significant interaction effect for the experimental teachers' use of child-teacher relationship skills (CTRT-SC: p = 0.036), a non-statistically significant interaction effect for the experimental teachers' ability to provide emotional support (CLASS: p = 0.50), and a non-statistically significant interaction effect on teacher stress (ITS: p = 0.997). Partial eta squared effect sizes were calculated to determine the practical significance of the findings. Compared to the active control, CTRT demonstrated large treatment effects over time on the CTRT-SC (?p[superscript 2] = 0.19) and the CLASS (?p[superscript 2] = 0.16). Study findings provide support for CTRT as an effective intervention for increasing Head Start teachers' ability to provide emotional and relational support to at-risk students. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Preschool Education; Early Childhood Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A