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ERIC Number: ED550795
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 156
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-1274-7
ISSN: N/A
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors That Impact the Retention and Completion of African-American Male and Female High School Students in the Pre-Engineering Program: Project Lead the Way
Green, Patrice Tolbert
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, South Carolina State University
African Americans have a long and very important history in the engineering fields. With a tradition that includes accomplished scientists such as George Washington Carver, Norman Buknor, and Mark Dean, African Americans have been very important to the development of new products, technology, inventions, and innovations (Gordon, 2008). The potential of a serious shortfall in the number of individuals entering the engineering fields is being evidenced. This is especially true for underrepresented minority students, particularly African Americans. Per the National Science Foundation, 2008, minority group members - African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians - are underrepresented in science, mathematics, and engineering relative to their numbers in the U.S. population, among high school graduates, and among those earning a baccalaureate degree. Furthermore, according to Waller (2006), "In the years ahead, these underrepresented minorities will constitute a growing population within the pool of students from which a highly skilled workforce will be drawn" (p. 540). Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the factors which influence 154 African-American students in South Carolina to participate in and successfully complete the secondary education pre-engineering program, Project Lead the Way (PLTW). It is critical to engage in meaningful dialogue to gain insight that can be used to help educators remove barriers, to provide effective support services for recruitment and retention, and to build a sustainable pipeline for those African-American students to attend PLTW. The following research questions were used to guide this study: 1. Is there a significant difference in school factors between male and female African-American Project Lead The Way (PLTW) students. 2. Is there a significant difference in ethnic identity between male and female African-American PLTW students. 3. Is there a significant difference in math/science expectations between male and female African-American PLTW students. 4. Is there a significant difference in math/science confidence between African-American male and female PLTW students. 5. Is there a significant difference in math/science interest between male and female African-American PLTW students. 6. Is there a significant difference in career decision making between male and female African-American PLTW students. 7. Is there a significant difference in family relations between male and female African-American PLTW students. 8. Is there a significant difference in the overall survey response between male and female African-American PLTW students. The study consisted of 154 9th-12th grade African-American students enrolled in PLTW which is a career and technology education secondary education pre-engineering program. There are 28 high schools statewide offering the program, which varies widely in demographics. The students were selected by utilizing The South Carolina Department of Education's Power School data base system. The main focus of the study was to determine if there was a gender difference in seven subscales (school factors, ethnic identity, math/science confidence, math/science interest, career decision making, and family relations) and the overall survey response from a 120-item survey administered to the students. T-test results showed that females had more math/science expectations and greater math/science interest than males. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Secondary Education; High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: South Carolina