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ERIC Number: ED550652
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 224
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2678-9086-3
ISSN: N/A
A Descriptive Study of Intrinsic Motivation in Three California Accredited Model Continuation High Schools
Dike, Daniel E.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of La Verne
Purpose: The first purpose of this study was to identify and describe teachers' perceptions of intrinsic motivation in classrooms among at-risk adolescent students in 3 model continuation high schools. The second purpose of this study was to identify and describe teacher practices that promote intrinsic motivation among at-risk adolescent students in 3 model continuation high schools. The third purpose of the study was to identify and describe evidence of intrinsic motivation among at-risk students outside of the classroom in 3 model continuation high schools. Methodology: This was a descriptive study of 3 model continuation high schools in Southern California. Data were triangulated from 4 methods of data collection: focus group interviews of teachers, individual structured interviews of teachers, observations in classrooms, and archival data gained through structured interviews with principals. Findings: There were 23 participating teachers who commonly identified that evidence exists of literature-based variables of intrinsic motivation in their classrooms, specifically self-determination, curiosity, feelings of competence, interest in tasks, recognition, autonomy, challenging tasks, sense of purpose, and satisfaction. Teachers identified indicators of intrinsic motivation in classrooms, and those indicators were validated in 21 classroom observations. Similar strategies for promoting and sustaining intrinsic motivation were shared by teachers in all 3 continuation schools. High levels of caring, interest, passion, and commitment in teaching at-risk adolescent students transcended similarly among teachers across the 3 model continuation high schools, as found in the researcher's observations and teachers' individual interviews. The principals' responses to interview questions, archival data, and the researcher's observations revealed that the at-risk adolescent students voluntarily and actively participated in extracurricular activities, attended school at an optimum rate, graduated at a higher rate, and voluntarily participated in various school activities. Conclusions: Across the 3 model continuation high schools, there were high levels of teacher engagement, caring, and principal support that created communities of support for the at-risk adolescent students to be intrinsically motivated in achieving their academic goals. The role of leadership (principals) in these 3 model continuation high schools made a significant impact outside the classroom in encouraging students to be intrinsically motivated to attain their academic goals. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California