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ERIC Number: ED550574
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 110
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2678-6565-6
ISSN: N/A
A Study of the Relationship between Cognitive Emotion Regulation, Optimism, and Perceived Stress among Selected Teachers in Lutheran Schools
Gliebe, Sudi Kate
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Problem: The problem of this study was to determine the relationship between perceived stress, as measured by the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and a specific set of predictor variables among selected teachers in Lutheran schools in the United States. These variables were cognitive emotion regulation strategies (positive reappraisal and rumination) and optimism. Procedure: The sample consisted of 582 early childhood teachers in Lutheran schools who are members of the Lutheran Education Association (LEA). Dr. Grube, Director of Publications and Communications at LEA, invited all 582 teachers to participate, 147 responded. They answered three surveys: the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ), and the Life Orientation Test Revised (LOT-R). Their responses were utilized for statistical analysis. A multiple regression was used to test the hypotheses. Findings: It was the first hypothesis of this study that positive reappraisal as measured by the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) and optimism as measured by the Life Orientation Test Revised (LOT-R) would be negative predictors of perceived stress among selected teachers in Lutheran schools in the United States. It was the second hypothesis of this study that rumination as measured by the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) would be a positive predictor of perceived stress among selected teachers in Lutheran schools in the United States. The hypotheses were tested and confirmed using a multiple regression. The criterion variable was perceived stress and the predictor variables were rumination, positive reappraisal, and optimism. The multiple regression revealed that all three independent variables (rumination, positive reappraisal, and optimism) are statistically significant predictors of perceived stress for this population of Lutheran teachers. The null hypothesis was rejected. Conclusions: This study shows that as levels of positive reappraisal and optimism increase, perceived stress decreases. This means that reappraising stressful situations in a positive light and having an optimistic outlook on life ameliorates stress. This study also shows that as rumination increases, perceived stress increases as well. This means that dwelling on the negative aspects of stressful situations exacerbates the experience of stress. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Preschool Education; Early Childhood Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A