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ERIC Number: ED550278
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 201
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2678-1494-4
ISSN: N/A
Academic Self-Efficacy, Faculty-Student Interactions, and Student Characteristics as Predictors of Grade Point Average
Gosnell, Joan C.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Barry University - Adrian Dominican School of Education
The purpose of the study was to explore student characteristics, academic self-efficacy, and faculty-student interactions as predictors of grade point average for upper-division (college level third and fourth year) education students at a public 4-year degree-granting community college. The study examined the effects of student characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, family educational history [first generation in college], and native [first] language), on academic self-efficacy, student-faculty student interactions, and students' self-reported cumulative grade point average. The research design used the multivariate statistical methods of multiple regression analysis and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Data were collected using convenience sampling from 135 upper-division (college level third and fourth year) education students at a public 4-year degree-granting institution. The data collection instruments used were the College Self-Efficacy Inventory (CSEI) and the Faculty-Student Subscale of the Institutional Integration Scale (IIS). Demographic and student data were also collected. Results of the multiple regression analysis found that the independent variables of student characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, family educational history, and native language), grouped, were a significant predictor of the students' self-reported grade point average (dependent variable). A significant regression equation was found, F(7, 120) = 2.341, p = 0.028, with an R[superscript 2] of 0.120. The individual variable, ethnicity, made a unique contribution to the predictive outcome of the students' self-reported cumulative grade point average. Neither family educational history nor native language was a predictor of students' self-reported cumulative grade point average. Results of the multiple regression assessing the ability of the measures for academic self-efficacy (i.e., a score on the CSEI) and faculty-student interactions (i.e., a score on the Faculty-Student Subscale of the IIS) to predict students' self-reported cumulative grade point average found that the regression equation was not significant, F(2, 96) =0.727, p = 0.486. A MANOVA found no significant difference in the dependent variables based on student characteristics. A secondary analysis, MANOVA, found significant differences for enrollment status (full-time or part-time) and the dependent variables, Lambda(3, 95) = 0.88, p = 0.007. Examined separately, the variable of faculty-student interactions was statistically different, F(1, 97) = 8.154, p = 0.005; partial n[superscript 2] = 0.078. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A