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ERIC Number: ED550080
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 127
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2671-7669-1
ISSN: N/A
The Mediating Effects of Work-Related Stress on Mentoring Functions and Job Attitude: A Comparison of General and Special Education Teachers
Rabenhorst, Greg A.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Northern Illinois University
The current study is designed to investigate the mediating effects of work-related stress on the relationship between mentoring functions (i.e., career support, psychosocial support, and role modeling) and measures of job attitude (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment). Mentoring is widely used as a means of assisting in the new teacher induction process across districts in the United States and Illinois in particular. Mentoring has been demonstrated to positively affect job outcomes such as job satisfaction and organizational commitment. These two specific outcome measures have also been predictive of retention in the field. Teacher attrition is a concern among public school districts due to the resources devoted to recruitment, hiring, inducting, and developing new teachers. The role of stress in new teachers' lives also impacts their job attitude and decisions to stay in the field. Educational research has identified differences in the effects of mentoring outcomes between general education and special education teachers. Research outside of education has established that work-related stress, as measured by role ambiguity and role conflict, mediates the relationship between mentoring functions and job outcomes. This study analyzed the self-report data of 260 teacher participants representing multiple districts across Northern Illinois. Responses were analyzed to determine the mediating effects of work-related stress on the relationship between mentoring functions and job attitude. Data analyses revealed that most mentor function variables were significantly negatively correlated with both role conflict and role ambiguity, suggesting that increased support from one's mentor was associated with less work-related stress. Likewise, each of the mentor function variables was significantly positively associated with both job attitude variables, indicating that increased support from one's mentor was associated with increased job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Finally, both work-related stress variables were significantly negatively associated with the job attitude variables, indicating that higher scores on role conflict and ambiguity were associated with lower scores on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. SEM analyses indicated that role conflict and role ambiguity partially mediated the relationship between Mentor Functions and Job Attitude but did not completely eliminate the direct relationship. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Illinois