NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED549641
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 202
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2672-8270-5
ISSN: N/A
Achievement and High School Completion Rates of Hispanic Students with No English Language Skills Compared to Hispanic Students with Some English Language Skills Attending the Same High School in an Immigrant Responsive City
Garrison, Joanne M.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Nebraska at Omaha
The purpose of the study was to determine achievement and high school completion rates of Hispanic students (n = 13) with no English language skills compared to Hispanic students (n = 11) with some English language skills attending the same high school in an immigrant responsive city. All students were in attendance in the research school district's high school, ninth-grade through 12th-grade. Entering ninth-grade pretest Las Links Assessment scores compared to the ending high school posttest English Language Development Assessment scores of immigrant high school students with no English Language skills enrolled in the research high school's English Language Acquisition Program were in the direction of improved speaking (p < 0.01), listening, (p < 0.001), reading (p < 0.001), writing (p<0.001), comprehension (p < 0.001), and composite (p < 0.001) dependent t test scores. Null Hypotheses were also rejected in the direction of improved speaking (p < 0.05), listening, (p < 0.05), reading (p < 0.01), comprehension (p < 0.05), and composite (p < 0.05) dependent t test scores for immigrant high school students with some English Language skills enrolled in the research high school's English Language Acquisition Program. However, null hypotheses were not rejected for any of the posttest-posttest English Language Development Assessment single classification Analysis of Variance scores comparisons. Results of chi-square ending twelfth-grade core credit accrual towards fulfilling graduation requirements of immigrant high school students with no English Language skills compared to immigrant high school students with some English Language skills enrolled in the research high school's English language acquisition program as measured by core credit accrual towards fulfilling graduation requirements by school year were statistically different (p = 0.008) in the direction of greater credit accrual for students with some English Language skills. The null hypothesis was rejected for observed absence frequencies across all four years of high school attendance. Students with no English Language Skills had significantly greater (p < 0.05) recorded absences. This pattern of absence frequencies represents a concern for students' who cannot afford to miss days of school if they are to succeed academically but who may have competing demands elsewhere at home and work. We have a moral and professional obligation to determine through research and careful analysis how to bring our immigrant students and families into a quid pro quo relationship with the world of academia-the world through which their hopes, aspirations, dreams, and talents may be realized. Immigrant students with no English language skills and some English language skills clearly benefited from participation in the research high school's English Language Acquisition program. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A