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ERIC Number: ED548009
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 225
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2674-2790-8
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship between Transformational Leadership Behaviors of Faculty Supervisors and Self-Efficacies of Graduate Assistants
Avci, Omer
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Northern Illinois University
Bass's transformational leadership theory is one of the most frequently applied theories of leadership in leadership research in education. However, the dyadic relationship between graduate assistants and the faculty as their immediate supervisors have not been investigated from a leader-follower perspective. In addition, self-efficacy beliefs, which suggest that beliefs about one's abilities are the core incentives for his/her actions, are positively related to academic performance. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between transformational leadership behaviors of faculty supervisors and the graduate teaching and research self-efficacies of graduate teaching assistants and graduate research assistants. Quantitative data were collected on three surveys including a demographic survey, MLQ form 5x (only transformational leadership items), Graduate Teaching Self-efficacy Scale (GTSES), and Graduate Research Self-efficacy Scale (GRSES). The statistical tests carried out were descriptive statistics, multiple regression, ordinal regression, logistic regression, and one-way ANOVA. Findings showed none of the transformational leadership behaviors (i.e., idealized influence behavior, idealized influence attribute, inspirational motivation, individualized consideration, and intellectual stimulation) of faculty supervisors were statistically significant predictors of graduate assistant teaching and research self-efficacies. The gender of the participants had no significant relationship with teaching self-efficacies of the TAs, however, female RAs' research self-efficacies are higher than the research self-efficacies of the male RAs This difference between the genders is statistically significant [F (1, 77) = 5.66, p < 0.05]. Ethnicity of the GAs did not have a significant relationship with their teaching and research self-efficacies. While the academic field of the TAs did not have a significant relationship with their teaching self-efficacies, the research self-efficacies of the RAs in non-science fields was significantly higher than the research self-efficacies of the RAs in science fields [F (1, 74) = 5.84, p < 0.05]. There was a positive statistically significant relationship between number of years as a TA and teaching self-efficacy [p = 0.008], as well as there was a positive statistically significant relationship between number of years as an RA and research self-efficacy [p = 0.039]. Gender of the faculty supervisors did not have a significant relationship with the graduate teaching self-efficacies of the TAs, while gender of the faculty supervisors had a significant relationship with the graduate research self-efficacies of the RAs [F (1,76) = 6.531, p < .05, ?[superscript 2] = 0.28]. The graduate research self-efficacies of the RAs, who were supervised by female faculty supervisors, were higher than the research self-efficacies of the RAs supervised by male faculty supervisors. The ethnicity of the faculty supervisors did not have a significant relationship with the teaching or research self-efficacies of the GAs. The academic fields of the faculty supervisors did not have a significant relationship with the teaching self-efficacies of the TAs, whereas there was a significant relationship between academic field of the faculty supervisors and the graduate research self-efficacies of the RAs [F (1,74) = 6.79, p < 0.05, ?[superscript 2] = 0.29]. The research self-efficacies of the RAs supervised by a faculty in a non-science field were significantly higher than the research self-efficacies of the RAs supervised by a faculty in a science field. Seniority of the faculty supervisors was not a significant predictor of the teaching or research self-efficacies of the GAs nor was academic rank of the faculty supervisors significantly related to the teaching or research self-efficacies of the GAs. Teaching self-efficacies of the TAs significantly predicted their satisfaction as a TA [(Hosmer & Lemeshow) x[superscript 2] = 3.762, p = 0.807]. Research self-efficacies of the RAs significantly predicted satisfaction as a research assistant [Model x[superscript 2] (1) = 10.75, p < 0.05]. Transformational leadership behaviors of faculty supervisors predicted the satisfaction of TAs and RAs as graduate teaching and research assistants [Model x[superscript 2] (1) = 41.03, p < 0.05]. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A