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ERIC Number: ED547948
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 218
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2674-3098-4
ISSN: N/A
An Exploratory Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices for Students Who Are ELLs
Nagarkar, Sushama
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
The purpose of this study was to explore whether teacher characteristics such as teacher quality, skills in teaching English language learners (ELLs), knowledge of second language acquisition, and attitudes towards ELLs impacted teachers' perceived importance and reported use of culturally responsive practices within their classrooms. The numbers of ELLs in US classrooms has increased substantially over the past three decades and districts are mandated by federal law to provide these students appropriate high quality instruction for their language learning needs, as well as their academic achievement. Research suggests that teachers need to be culturally responsive while trying to meet the needs of these students (Gay, 2002). This study examined what teacher characteristics contributed to the regular utilization of culturally responsive practices within classrooms. The study was conducted in three school districts in a midwestern state and teachers who chose to participate took an anonymous on-line survey. Findings from the study indicated that the single most important predictor of teachers' perceived importance and reported use of culturally responsive practices in the classroom was teacher attitudes towards ELLs. Professional development proved to be somewhat important for reported use of culturally responsive practices. Additionally, the perceived importance of culturally responsive practices was a strong predictor of reported use of culturally responsive practices. There was a weak relationship between teacher knowledge of second language acquisition and perceived importance of culturally responsive practices. Implications for current practice and future research are discussed. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
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Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A