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ERIC Number: ED547700
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 104
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2674-7257-1
ISSN: N/A
Perceptions of the Impact of School Administrators on Teacher Retention
Knight, Zsa Zsa L.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
This qualitative study investigated the behaviors of administrators and their impact on teacher retention. Teachers' perceptions were obtained in order to gain further understanding of the impact that administrators have on teachers' job satisfaction as well as of administrators' motivation to increase teacher retention. According to M. Fullan ("What's Worth Fighting for in the Principalship?" 1997), receiving feedback on employees' thoughts and feelings is a necessary process in assessing collective reflections in order to make change. Particularly, the research focused on several areas and strategies implemented by administrators who work in a South Atlantic U.S. state at the middle school level. The researcher examined teachers' primary reasons for staying in the teaching profession. This research involved 4 focus groups, each consisting of 3 administrators and 3 teachers. The administrators and teachers studied had 5 or more years of experience in the capacity of administration and education. After completion of focus group discussions, transcripts were assessed; common categories were created into themes that were used to make meaning of the data. Teacher retention remains a major concern for the support of students. As the research indicates, administrators are instrumental in the full operation of schools' success. The results of this research imply that the improvement of teacher retention is directly impacted by effective leadership practices. Administrators and teachers agreed that practices involving teacher support and collaboration may be the key that impacts teachers' decision to stay in the classroom. Further research beyond this study is needed to determine how administrators can be held accountable for ensuring teacher job satisfaction. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A