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ERIC Number: ED546658
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 189
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2674-9660-7
ISSN: N/A
College Alcohol Policy and Student Drinking-while-Driving: A Multilevel Model
Liu, Jing
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, State University of New York at Albany
Alcohol prohibition and legal or administrative sanctions have been implemented in attempts to curb alcohol drinking and drinking-while-driving in the general population as well as among college students. This dissertation study examines the impact of college alcohol prohibition and policy enforcement on students' alcohol drinking and drinking-while-driving behaviors through four mechanisms. First, it is hypothesized that college alcohol prohibition and the certainty and severity with which alcohol policies are enforced influence individual students' perceived alcohol accessibility and punishment risk. Second, it is hypothesized that college alcohol prohibition and policy enforcement reduce student alcohol drinking, which in turn reduces student drinking-while-driving. Third, it is hypothesized that college alcohol prohibition and policy enforcement push students off campus to obtain alcohol, inadvertently increasing their risks of drinking-while-driving by increasing their driving frequency. Fourth, it is hypothesized that college alcohol prohibition and policy enforcement reduce student drinking-while-driving directly, after controlling for student drinking levels and driving frequency. Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM), this dissertation study analyzes a large-scale, nationally representative sample of college students in the United States. Results reveal the complex relationships between college alcohol policy and student drinking-while-driving, and provide partial support for deterrence theory and on-campus alcohol prohibition. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
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Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A