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ERIC Number: ED546310
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 163
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2676-2487-1
ISSN: N/A
Preschool Educators' Perceptions of Practice in Facilitating/Modeling Oral Language Acquisition and Development
Jones, Nicole Alissa
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Loyola University Chicago
Preschool educators are linguistic models for their students. They prompt students to speak. Educators who are able to understand the critical nature of their role in the students' oracy development and to deliberately encourage conversation may have a profound impact on preschoolers who may be at risk. Oracy is self-expression prompted by discourse activities such as questioning, labeling, turn-taking in conversation, and it is stimulated by a variety of speech events, such as playing or otherwise interacting with peers and adults. This study explored how preschool educators behaved as models in facilitating oral language acquisition and development. The goals of this study were to answer the following research questions: (1) What are the perceptions/practices of preschool educators in racially, linguistically and economically discrete preschool programs with regard to their role in developing oral competencies/oracy among their students? (2) What are the perceptions/practices of preschool educators in racially, linguistically and economically discrete preschool programs with regard to their role in facilitating second language acquisition? (3) What are the perceptions/practices of preschool educators in racially, linguistically and economically discrete preschool programs with regard to the instructional strategies used to facilitate interaction among their students? The research of McEwan (2002) and Wilcox (2000), Hart and Risley (2003), Ard and Beverly (2004) and Weigel (2007) suggests that oral language (oracy) development is a readiness factor for later reading, writing and listening competencies. Intentional strategies to promote oracy can narrow the reading achievement gap between students in racially, linguistically and economically discrete neighborhoods and their peers from more diverse environments. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Preschool Education; Early Childhood Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A