NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED546302
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 106
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2676-2234-1
ISSN: N/A
Exploring the Efficacy of Online American Sign Language Instruction
Radford, Curt L.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Lamar University - Beaumont
Advances in technology have significantly influenced educational delivery options, particularly in the area of American Sign Language (ASL) instruction. As a result, ASL online courses are currently being explored in higher education. The review of literature remains relatively unexplored regarding the effectiveness of learning ASL online. In addition, there exists little research that compares the student's ASL receptive and expressive skills among three delivery methods: face-to-face, hybrid, and online. This study sought to contribute to research by examining the ASL levels of one college where students were engaged in learning level one ASL through the three delivery methods. This quantitative study attempted to show whether there was a difference among the delivery methods by comparing student performance. Student grades for each class section were gathered from a database using ASL level 1 sections during school years of 2009-2011. Analyses of the data revealed there was no statistically significant difference in student grades among the three delivery methods using ANOVA. A one-way ANOVA was conducted to determine if there was a statistical difference at the p <0.05 level between course grades and the three delivery modes, F (2, 176, 178) = 0.559, p = 0.573. There was no statistical difference for course grades among the three delivery methods. The null hypothesis for research question 1 can be accepted. A one-way ANOVA was conducted to determine if there was a statistical difference at the p <0.05 level between student receptive skills and the three delivery modes, F (2,176,178) = 0.378, p = 0.686. There was no statistical difference for receptive skills among the three delivery methods. The null hypothesis for research question 2 can be accepted. A one-way ANOVA was conducted to determine if there was a statistical difference at the p< 0.05 level between students' expressive skills and the three delivery modes, classifier project F (2,176,178) = 1.460, p = 0.235. The final project F (2,176,178) = 0.104, p = 0.902. There was no statistical difference for expressive skills among the three delivery methods. The null hypothesis for research question 3 can be accepted. It is important to note that while grades may be indicative of learning, they are not the only means to ascertain student performance. Therefore, future studies should consider the use of measuring specific skills among different instructors using different learning management systems. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A