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ERIC Number: ED545956
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 145
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2675-7034-5
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship between Teachers' Attitudes toward Technology and Technology Use
DeCuir, Alvin F., Jr.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
Researchers have recognized that technology use is critical to students' engagement and the resulting increase in higher order thinking skills. However, educators are not using available technology to engage students' higher order thinking. Both the purpose of this study and the research question was to determine if teachers' attitudes toward technology, experience, age, and gender would predict the types of technology teachers used to foster students' cognitive engagement. Rogers's diffusion of innovation theory and Bloom's digital taxonomy served as the theoretical framework for the research. Quantitative data were collected using Teachers' Attitudes toward Computers (TAC) Survey and a matrix of Bloom's Taxonomy and level of technology use. The sample was comprised of 55 teachers from an urban high school. Both descriptive statistics and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Low total TAC scores indicated that teachers had unfavorable attitudes towards technology. Through multiple regression analysis, it was found that the linear combination of teacher attitudes toward technology, teachers' experience, age, and gender was not significantly related to technology usage. It is recommended that schools provide professional development to educate teachers on the benefits of the connections among higher-level thinking, technology, and student engagement. Positive social change includes the possibility of increased student learning, as teachers integrate higher order thinking with instructional technology strategies for the purpose of engaging students. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
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Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A