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ERIC Number: ED545673
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 145
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2675-9247-7
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Union Official and Central Office Administrator Descriptions of the Level of Difficulty and Importance for Negotiating Selected Elements of Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) into Teacher Collective Bargaining Agreements
Neville, Patricia A.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Dowling College
The relationship between teacher union officials and central office administrators' descriptions of the level of importance and the level of difficulty when negotiating Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) language into a teachers' union collective bargaining agreement was examined. Relationships were investigated using the New York State Education Department's teacher evaluation rubric, which was based on Charlotte Danielson's Framework for Teaching. The seven dimensions investigated were: 1) Knowledge of Student and Student Learning, 2) Knowledge of Content and Instructional Planning, 3) Instructional Practice, 4) Learning Environment, 5) Assessment of Student Learning, 6) Professional Responsibility and Collaboration, and 7) Professional Growth. For this study, independent samples t tests, correlations analysis, and logistic regressions were performed. Teacher union officials tended to agree that it would be difficult to negotiate APPR language into a teachers' union collective bargaining agreement. Central office administrators tended to agree that it would be very important to negotiate APPR language into a teachers' union collective bargaining agreement. More specifically, central office administrators reported that statistically significant higher levels of importance were placed on dimensions including student learning, instructional practice, learning environment, assessment of student learning, professional responsibility and collaboration and professional growth. Teacher union officials indicated that dimensions of instructional planning, instructional practice, learning environment, professional responsibility and collaboration and professional growth would be more difficult to negotiate. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: New York