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ERIC Number: ED544654
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Jan
Pages: 2
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-
Preschoolers Benefit from Mental Health Screening. FPG Snapshot. Number 50. January 2008
FPG Child Development Institute
More than a quarter of all Americans have a mental disorder at some point in their lives, according to a 2004 study by the World Health Organization. As anyone who has experienced mental illness knows, it can interfere with work, relationships, and every aspect of daily living. Children are not immune to such disorders or their effects. Research suggests that 11-15 percent of children under the age of 18 have a diagnosable mental disorder. Some studies have estimated that up to a third of high risk children may experience difficulty. In spite of numerous studies demonstrating the mental health needs of children, only 21 percent of children nationally who might benefit from mental health screening and evaluations actually receive them, and only 20 percent of those who needed services were provided them. Because children with behavioral and emotional problems struggle to succeed in school, public preschool programs with a focus on school readiness are recognizing the significance of children's socio-emotional difficulties. A new study by FPG researcher Oscar Barbarin demonstrates that preschoolers can benefit by a simple and inexpensive mental health screening process designed to flag potential signs of more serious problems. Dr. Barbarin developed ABLE--a screening tool to identify young children with self-regulation problems with attention, behavior, language, and emotions. ABLE is described and explained in this document.
FPG Child Development Institute. University of North Carolina, Publications Office, CB# 8185, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8185. Tel: 919-966-0857; e-mail: FPGpublications@unc.edu; Web site: http://www.fpg.unc.edu/
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Preschool Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, FPG Child Development Institute