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ERIC Number: ED543281
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 137
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2675-3680-8
ISSN: N/A
A Study of Education Today: Interactive Classroom Educational Technology Strategies (ICETS)
Diaz, Jorge Luis
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Union Institute and University
This research study was conducted in order to use the created program Interactive Classroom Educational Technology (ICETS) with students attending an inner-city high school for developing testing skills to enable higher scores on the test formally known as the American College Test (ACT), now simply named the ACT, English subtest. The proposed quasi-experimental study's design incorporated intervention groups during the first three weeks of a nine-week intervention. The material used was introduced through a Promethean[R] Whiteboard Flipchart slide and students answered the question(s) using the Activote[R] device for 60 seconds each. At three-week intervals the speed of passages was accelerated until the proper rate of seventy-five questions in forty-five minutes was reached. The decision to conduct a study using technology comes from an interest in its history and use in education. As of 2001, 99% of schools and 87% of classrooms in America had access to the Internet (Kleiner & Farris, 2002). As Klopfer, Osterweil, Groff, & Haas (2009) explain "[t]here are countless educators who are masters at their craft, currently employing an array of exceptional instructional strategies" (p. 3). Through the introduction of an innovative program that enables teachers to deliver instruction through advanced technological methods, the collection of data on student progress and success in content area requirements was achieved. "These technologies don't just help us teach the old stuff in new ways--they can also help us teach new stuff in new ways" (Klopfer, et al., 2009 p. 4). Although the results of the study were inconclusive as to whether the technological intervention improved ACT scores, the data indicate a need for further research in this area. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education; High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: ACT Assessment