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ERIC Number: ED543039
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1912
Pages: 112
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Current Educational Topics No. II: Abstracts of Papers Presented at St. Louis, Missouri, February 26-29, 1912, before the National Council of Education of the National Education Association; the Department of Superintendence of the National Education Association; the Department of Normal Schools of the National Education Association; the National Society for the Study of Education; the Society of College Teachers of Education; the National Committee on Agricultural Education. Bulletin, 1912, No. 15. Whole Number 487
Noyes, Frederick K.
United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior
This bulletin presents abstracts of papers presented at St. Louis, Missouri, February 26-29, 1912, before the National Council of Education of the National Education Association; the Department of Superintendence of the National Education Association; the Department of Normal Schools of the National Education Association; the National Society for the Study of Education; the Society of College Teachers of Education; and the National Committee on Agricultural Education. Abstracts of papers presented to the National Council of Education, National Education Association include: (1) Economy of time in education (James H. Baker and James M. Green); (2) Economy of time in elementary and education (James H. Van Sickle); (3) High-school preparation of candidates for normal schools (David Felmley, J. H. Phillips, Homer H. Seerley, and Charles S. Chapin); (4) High-school preparation of normal-school candidates, from the high-school point of view (J. Stanley Brown); (5) Health problems in education (Thomas D. Wood); (6) Securing public support for health work in schools (William H. Allen); (7) Status of the country school (E.T. Fairchild); (8) Consolidation of rural schools (Adelaide Steele Baylor); (9) Standardization of the country schools (Thomas H. Harris); (10) Rural-school funds--their source and distribution (Edward C. Elliott); (11) The rural-school plant (Luther L. Wright); (12) The problem of rural education (David Snedden); (13) The problems of standards or tests of the efficiency of schools or systems of schools (George Drayton Strayer, Carroll G. Pearse, Charles H. Judd, and Lotis D. Coffman); and (14) Standards and tests of rural-school efficiency (Edward C. Elliott). Abstracts of papers presented to the Department of Superintendence, National Education Association include: (1) Waste and efficiency in school studies (W. H. Elson); (2) Departmental teaching in the elementary grades (W. L. Stephens); (3) The child v. promotion machinery (D. E. Phillips); (4) Some adjustments and changes in the course of study, and school organization suggested by the needs and the capacities of children that vary from the standards set for average pupils (D. H. Christensen); (5) A reorganization of our school system (J. H. Francis); (6) The value of the educational commission in determining the efficiency of a city school system (Calvin N. Kendall); (7) The relation of an urban community to its public-school system (Martin G. Brumbaugh); (8) How may a community learn its unmet school needs? (William H. Allen); (9) Quantitative tests in education (George H. Chatfield); (10) The function of the kindergarten in the public-school system (Lucy Wheelock); (11) Duty of superintendents in the enforcement of child-labor laws (Owen R. Lovejoy); (12) How far shall the public-school system care for the feeble-minded? (James H. Van Sickle); (13) Do schools of trades meet the needs of city children for vocational training? (Carroll G. Pearse); (14) How should the school system contribute to an intelligent choice of vocation on the part of the pupil? (George Platt Knox); (15) The education of girls (I. D. Harvey); (16) The educative value of the study of agriculture (Earl Barnes); (17) The next step in teaching agriculture in rural schools (E. C. Bishop); (18) Types of special schools in the larger American cities (Andrew W. Edson); (19) A definite propaganda to impress upon the American mind the necessity of an expansion of the field of education to provide as ample facilities for education by work and education by play as are now provided for education by study (M. G. Brumbaugh); (20) The scientific study of arithmetic work in school (J. T. Giles); (21) The utilization of the school plant (William Wirt); (22) Vocational guidance (Meyer Bloomfield); (23) The schoolhouse as the civic and social center of the community (Edward J. Ward); (24) The bookman in his relation to the textbook problem (Frank A. Fitzpatrick); (25) Effect on education and morals of the moving picture shows (Joseph R. Fulk); (26) Standardization of janitor service (G. M. Wilson); and (27) Relative cost of education of high and elementary school pupils (E. O. Holland). Abstracts of papers presented to the Department of Normal Schools, National Education Association include: (1) Attitude of the normal schools toward education (W. J. Hawkins); (2) Work of the normal school in the reorganization of the elementary school curriculum (Eugene W. Bohannon); (3) Place of the normal school in agricultural education (E. E. Bacomb); (4) Place of the State normal school in agricultural education (W. M. Stewart); and (5) A plan of normal school statistics (Homer H. Seerley). Abstracts of papers presented to the National Society for the Study of Education include: (1) Classification of plans for industrial training (Frank Mitchell Leavitt); (2) Prevocational industrial training in the seventh and eighth grades (George A. Mirick); (3) The separate or independent industrial school (M. W. Murray); (4) The separate technical high school (James F. Barker); (5) Industrial training in the cosmopolitan high schools (H. B. Wilson); (6) The public trade school (Charles F. Perry); (7) The part-time cooperative plan of industrial education (Adelbert L. Safford); (8) The Cincinnati continuation schools (Pliny Johnston); (9) Vocational guidance (Meyer Bloomfield); (10) Training of teachers for secondary courses in agriculture (A. C. Monahan); (11) The vocational agricultural school. With special emphasis on part-time work in agriculture (R. W. Stimson); (12) State aided departments of agriculture in public high schools (Dick J. Crosby); (13) High-school agriculture without State subsidy (W. H. French); (14) In public high schools should agriculture be taught as agriculture or as splendid science? (William R. Hart and G. F. Warren); (15) What should be the difference between graduate and undergraduate work in education (Edward F. Buchner); (16) Relation of normal schools to departments and schools of education in universities (George F. James, Charles H. Johnston, and Elmer E. Jones); (17) Undergraduate degrees in education in various colleges and universities (James E. Lough); (18) Undergraduate degrees in education in various colleges and universities: Outline of a course in school hygiene (William H. Beck); (19) Undergraduate degrees in education in various colleges and universities: Their academic and professional requirements (Anna Jane McKeag); (20) The present status of education as a science: The problem of educational psychology (V. A. C. Henmon); (21) The present status of education as a science: The principles of education (William C. Ruediger); (22) The present status of education as a science: The principles of education (Bird T. Baldwin); and (23) The present status of education as a science: Educational methods (S. Chester Parker). Abstracts of papers presented to the National Committee on Agricultural Education include: (1) Definiteness in agriculture (A. B. Hess); and (2) What Uncle Sam carries in the second-class mail: Does this help the farmers or other industrial workers? (J. W. Heston and Manley J. Wixson). An index is included. [Best copy available has been provided.]
United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior.
Publication Type: Collected Works - General; Historical Materials
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; Middle Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Department of the Interior, United States Bureau of Education (ED)