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ERIC Number: ED541939
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Apr
Pages: 2
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Abecedarian Project: High-Quality Early Child Care Has Long-Lasting Effects. FPG Snapshot #66
FPG Child Development Institute
Do the positive effects of an intensive early childhood educational program extend into adulthood? FPG researchers used comprehensive longitudinal data from the Abecedarian Project to try to answer that important question. The Abecedarian Project was a prospective randomized trial involving primarily African-American families (98%) that began in 1972. The first phase of the intervention provided early childhood education within a high-quality child care setting from early infancy to kindergarten entry at age 5 for half the children while the others served as controls. A second phase of treatment randomly assigned half the children who had child care treatment and half those in the control group to receive the services of a special teacher for the first three years in public school. This teacher alternated bi-weekly visits between classroom and home and designed customized learning activities to reinforce at home skills being taught at school. Thus, the timing and duration of intervention varied from age 0-8 years, or from age 0-5 years, or from age 5-8 years, to no intervention at all, depending on the subgroup to which participants belonged. Because assignment to treatment groups was random, children's developmental outcomes can more fairly be attributed to treatment itself rather than to initial differences in family circumstances. Outcomes of the study showed that: (1) Abecedarian Project early childhood participants had significantly more years of education by age 30 than individuals in the control group; (2) Although the income-to-needs ratio was more favorable for those with early childhood treatment, the difference was not statistically significant; and (3) There were no treatment group differences in criminal activity, the primary outcome of interest. (Contains 1 resource.)
FPG Child Development Institute. University of North Carolina, Publications Office, CB# 8185, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8185. Tel: 919-966-0857; e-mail: FPGpublications@unc.edu; Web site: http://www.fpg.unc.edu/
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Early Childhood Education; Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; Kindergarten; Preschool Education; Primary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, FPG Child Development Institute