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ERIC Number: ED541322
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1919
Pages: 31
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Schools of Austria-Hungary. Bulletin, 1919, No. 54
Pearson, Peter H.
Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior
The political changes now taking place in Austria-Hungary will be followed undoubtedly by far-reaching alterations in the school system, whereby old modes will be swept away and new ones inaugurated. In the present sketch the attempt is made to treat only such problems and movements as are likely to continue in some form and thereby maintain a living interest, even under a new political administration. Whatever the new political units may be, school men will continue to give attention to centralized control of schools as against local control, which is the substance of the State public school problem that has long occupied the attention of teachers in Austria. In Austria-Hungary the Ministry of Education exercised supreme control over all schools with the exception of certain institutions under the management of the Department of Agriculture. The immediate control was vested in the provincial legislature and carried out through (a) a school council for the crownland; (b) a district board for each district; and (c) a loco board for each community. The legislature selected the members of the crownland councils from the clergy, the citizens, and the specialists in education. The same authority also ratified the appointed membership of the district and local boards, determining the power vested in the several boards and the details of arrangements under which they discharged their duties. The school programs and schedules were drawn up under the direction of the Ministry of Education on the basis of outlines furnished by the crownland councils. The power of enacting laws for the folk school was apportioned between the State and the several Provinces, according to the constitution of 1867. The power of determining the principles was reserved to the State; all other matters, such as founding and maintaining schools, insuring attendance, inspection, fixing the legal status of teachers in respect to appointment, salaries, retirement, discipline--all these matters were left to the legislatures of the crownlands. (Contains 13 footnotes.) [Best copy available has been provided.]
Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior.
Publication Type: Historical Materials; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education (ED)
Identifiers - Location: Austria; Hungary