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ERIC Number: ED541265
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Mar
Pages: 27
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teaching the Movement: The State Standards We Deserve
Shuster, Kate
Southern Poverty Law Center (NJ1)
The September 2011 report, "Teaching the Movement: The State of Civil Rights Education in the United States 2011," was prompted by the news that American high school seniors knew little about the civil rights movement. Knowing that low expectations often contribute to poor student achievement, the report took a close look at the content requirements set by each state. The study showed that most states failed to require teaching about the civil rights movement. It called for states to improve their standards and raise expectations of what students should learn. While the forest may not be in good condition overall, this report shows that many of its trees are alive and well. With some care and relatively straightforward modifications, most states can easily transform their existing standards into outstanding requirements. The four models here show different approaches that are applicable to every state. In a world where classroom time, especially social studies instructional time, is increasingly at a premium, it is sometimes tempting to opt for breadth of coverage instead of depth. These standards show that states and teachers do not need to make that choice when it comes to one of America's most important historical events. Small changes and attention to detail avoid overburdening teachers while setting the high expectations that their students deserve. (Contains 16 endnotes and 2 footnotes.)
Southern Poverty Law Center. 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104. Tel: 334-956-8200; Web site: http://www.splcenter.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Southern Poverty Law Center
Identifiers - Location: Alabama; District of Columbia; Florida; New York; United States