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ERIC Number: ED541051
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 184
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2674-0375-9
ISSN: N/A
Building-Level Administrators' Perceptions of the Roles and Functions of Professional School Counselors
DiDomenico-Sorrento, Tara M.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, D'Youville College
The aim of this survey research study is to describe and analyze how building-level high school administrators (BLAB) view the roles and functions of professional school counselors (PSCs), particularly as they relate to the National Model of the American Counseling Association (ASCA) that was developed from the ASCA's National Standards. Online and mailed questionnaires were used to ascertain the extent to which administrators' perceptions of school counselors' roles and functions corresponded with the ASCA's definition of appropriate responsibilities. A saturation sample of building administrators from 148 schools within the Western New York area is the population surveyed. In particular, the high school administrators will include principals, assistant principals, house principals, athletic directors, and any dean of students. Descriptive statistics were used to determine whether attitudinal differences between subgroups exist based on years of experience, age, gender, certification completed, and present position within a school district. A total of 113 respondents participated in this study, including 38.8% (n = 47) female administrators with a mean age of 42, and 61.2% (n = 74) male administrators with a mean age of 42. Only six of the ninety-six hypothesized differences between administrator and school characteristics (i.e., gender, length of employment, educational level, and enrollment size) and perceptions of roles and functions identified by the ASCA National Model attained statistical significance. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: New York