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ERIC Number: ED540657
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 247
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2671-2237-7
ISSN: N/A
Key Motivational Factors in the Retention of Three Generations of Public High School Mathematics Teachers
Pospichal, Wendy
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of La Verne
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the similarities and differences between five key motivational factors: (a) new teacher induction, (b) noninduction mentor support in the early years of teaching, (c) salary and benefits, (d) working conditions, and (e) administrative support influential in retention of employment in the teaching profession as reported by public high school mathematics teachers in each of three generational cohorts: (a) Baby Boomer, (b) Generation X, and (c) Generation Y. Methodology: The subjects in the present study were 30 public high school mathematics teachers representing five western Riverside County school districts. Ten subjects represented each of three generational cohorts: (1) Baby Boomer, (2) Generation X, and (3) Generation Y. Subjects responded to a telephone interview utilizing 10 semistructured interview questions assessing the individual perceptions of the influence of five key factors on job retention. Findings: Examination of quantitative data from the 30 interviews identifying key factors influential in the decision to remain in the profession as mathematics teachers indicated salary, retirement benefits, and noninduction mentoring in the early years of teaching are most influential to Baby Boomers; health benefits, supportive working conditions, and supportive administration are most influential to Generation X; and noninduction mentoring in the early years of teaching , supportive working conditions, and supportive administrators are most influential for Generation X. Secondly, participation in induction programs was not a positive influence in the decision to remain in the profession teaching mathematics for Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. Conclusions: The study data support the conclusion that for all generations the creation of a supportive working environment including mentoring, departmental support, administrative support, and district support is most influential in retaining public high school mathematics teachers. Recommendations: Further research is advised: descriptive studies to determine (1) specific characteristics of positive formal and informal mentoring experiences perceived as influential in employment retention that may be duplicated and (2) similarities and differences in perceptions of induction as influential in job retention based upon curricular area taught. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California