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ERIC Number: ED540460
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 152
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2672-4639-4
ISSN: N/A
Instructional Strategies Perceived by Elementary School Principals and Fourth-Grade Teachers that Substantially Support the Development of Standard English Language Skills and Reading Proficiency in African American Students
Johnston, Kenneth
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of La Verne
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which instructional strategies elementary school principals and fourth-grade teachers perceive substantially support the development of Standard English language skills and reading proficiency in African American students. Methodology: The study used a descriptive case study. The findings were derived from interviews at 8 elementary schools located in south Los Angeles, California, which included 6 principals and 13 fourth-grade teachers. Findings: The findings indicated that African American students fall behind because the language they use at home and on the streets is different from the Standard English used in classrooms; African American students should be taught the art of code-switching between home, street, and standard English language; and different strategies must be utilized to enrich oral language and academic skills. Findings from the study further support that teachers should be formally trained in African American speech and principals should transform the culture of the school to utilize the strategies conducive to meeting the language needs of African American students, as well as provide time for collaboration and articulation between the grade levels. Conclusions: The conclusions were (a) language arts skills should be taught using enriched oral language interaction; (b) African American students fall behind, because the language they use at home and on the streets is different from the Standard English used in classrooms; (c) African American students should be taught the art of code-switching; (d) different strategies must be utilized to enrich oral language and academic skills; (e) teachers should be formally trained in African American speech; (f) principals should transform the culture of the school to utilize the strategies conducive to meeting the language needs of African American students; and (g) principals must provide time for teachers to collaborate and articulate between the grade levels. Recommendations: This study should be replicated (a) with a larger sample of elementary school principals and teachers; (b) be undertaken in other regions throughout the state to determine if the findings of this study are consistent statewide; and (c) to determine if teacher training in African American Vernacular English will substantially improve the Standard English language development in African American students. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Grade 4
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California