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ERIC Number: ED538653
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 118
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2671-8233-3
ISSN: N/A
The Dual Role of Instructor/Designer: Use of Instructional Design Practices in the Design of K-12 Online Instruction
Hooie, Jennifer H.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
As K-12 online offerings gain in popularity, districts search for cost effective ways to implement online courses. Most districts opt to use current staff members to both develop and teach the online offerings. Merrill (The future of instructional design: The proper study of instructional design, 2007) explains that individuals with no formal training in instructional design (ID) design 95% of online offerings. Because the majority of these teachers lack formal training in instructional design, the quality of these offerings may be in jeopardy. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to identify the instructional design practices implemented and those excluded by those individuals holding the dual role of instructor/designer as well as their reasons for excluding certain practices. This information may then be used in the planning and implementation of professional development for those holding this role. The first survey Phase of the study was adapted from the research of Tessmer and Wedman (The practice of instructional design: A survey of what designers do, don't do, and why they don't do it, 1992) and Wedman and Tessmer (Instructional decisions and priorities: A survey of instructional design practice, 1993). Fifty participants responded to the online survey. The results indicated that those participating in the study that had no formal instructional design training did not consistently implement instructional design practices. Further, during the interview Phase of the study, the participants expressed very different beliefs about their level of control in the design process. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A