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ERIC Number: ED538648
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2003-Nov-24
Pages: 3
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teaming and Achievement. Research Brief
Muir, Mike
Education Partnerships, Inc.
Teaming is certainly being pointed to as a strategy to improve learning for at risk students. Whether teaming is actually effective at improving student achievement seems to have mixed findings. Some studies find no significant differences for reading, math, science, and social studies achievement, where others state "evidence abounds suggesting that teaming results in higher achievement in math, reading and language arts skills." There is hard research on teaming, however, but most of it comes from the middle school level. The key factor for positively increasing student achievement through teaming seems to be the extent to which the team uses the team structure to focus on learning activities. The general consensus from the research on teaming is that it is beneficial on several levels. Outcomes include improvements to work climate, parental contact, job satisfaction, and higher student achievement. Critical issues for schools to consider on the path to teaming include: (1) The first is that after teams have been formed, teachers must focus on learning to work together as well as what types of activities they will undertake as a group; (2) Second is that common planning time is a critical component of a team's success; (3) Third, teams with fewer students engage more frequently in team activities and have more positive interactions among team members; and (4) And finally, teams that have been working together for a longer period of time have benefited from the longevity of their team relationship as evidenced by more coordination activities as well as greater feelings of success in their work. (Contains 5 online resources.)
Education Partnerships, Inc. Web site: http://www.educationpartnerships.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Education Partnerships, Inc. (EPI)