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ERIC Number: ED538485
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 139
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2672-0166-9
ISSN: N/A
An Investigation of Influencing Factors for Adopting Federated Identity Authentication in Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)
Tadesse, Yohannes
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
The importance of information security has made many organizations to invest and utilize effective information security controls within the information systems (IS) architecture. An organization's strategic decisions to secure enterprise-wide services often associated with the overall competitive advantages that are attained through the process of technology acceptance. Several researches show that technology acceptance frameworks are evaluative methods to offer theoretical explanations whether adopting new technologies are essential to the organization's business needs. Technology acceptance model (TAM) has been an effective method to evaluate factors that influence users' perceptions to adopt technological innovations. By extending TAM's seminal independent factors of perceived usefulness (PU) and perceived ease of use (PEOU), this study added cost-effectiveness (CE) and security-effectiveness (SE) as presumed predictors towards the use of federated identity authentication in a service-oriented architecture (SOA). A quantitative research approach was appropriate to assess influencing factors with the perception of IT decision-makers' recommendation to accept or reject a new technology within the state of Minnesota's agencies. The research indicates that significant relationships of PU, PEOU, and CE were obtained with IT decision-makers' intention to recommend federated identity authentication technologies. However, SE was not a strong predictor to recommend the use of authentication technology. The implications of this study are to provide IT decision-makers insights about the adoption process of authentication technologies and to make informed decisions on future improvement of information security implementations. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Minnesota