NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED537885
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2004-Apr
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Stepping Backwards: The Fraying of Massachusetts' Commitment to Students at the Front Lines of School Reform. A Policy Report from the "Keep the Promise" Initiative. Volume II, Number 1
Mass Insight Education (NJ1)
The second year of "Keep the Promise" Research--an in-depth, three-year study of academic remediation programs in Massachusetts' three largest school districts--is producing an array of evidence demonstrating the severely negative impact of the Commonwealth's 80% cut in MCAS remediation funding in the F'04 budget. This report--a mid-year, interim publication from the second year of Keep the Promise research--puts specific numbers on the impact of the cuts in Worcester, Springfield, and Boston and describes the qualitative decline of academic support programs as well. The inescapable conclusion is that Massachusetts has taken a significant--but reparable--step backwards in its effort to keep its promises to all of the students served by its public schools. (Contains 1 figure and 3 tables.) [Additional funding for this research was provided by the State Street Corporation, and John Hancock.]
Mass Insight Education. 18 Tremont Street Suite 1010, Boston, MA 02108. Tel: 617-778-1500; Fax: 617-778-1505; e-mail: insight@massinsight.org; Web site: http://www.massinsight.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; High Schools; Middle Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Boston Foundation; Massachusetts Department of Education; Irene E. and George A. Davis Foundation; Allmerica Foundation
Authoring Institution: Mass Insight Education
Identifiers - Location: Massachusetts
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: No Child Left Behind Act 2001
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System