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ERIC Number: ED537845
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Nov
Pages: 17
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 33
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Clarifying Parent Involvement and Family-School Partnership Intervention Research: A Preliminary Synthesis. CYFS Working Paper No. 2012-4
Sheridan, Susan M.; Kim, Elizabeth Moorman; Coutts, Michael J.; Sjuts, Tara M.; Holmes, Shannon R.; Ransom, Kelly A.; Garbacz, S. Andrew
Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools
Interactions and experiences within home and school systems, uniquely and together, form the foundation for developmental trajectories throughout students' educational careers. As a lifelong resource, families represent the first essential system and source of support for the learning and development of children and adolescents. When parents are involved in their children's learning, children experience increased achievement and academic performance, stronger self-regulatory skills, fewer discipline problems, better study habits, more positive attitudes toward school, improved homework habits and work orientation, and higher educational aspirations. Two distinct approaches to family intervention can be found in the school-based literature: family/parent involvement and family-school partnership. Despite general support, research inconsistencies are evident. Variability in findings could be due to the imprecision with which the construct has been investigated. Studies have often failed to operationalize the variable of interest, or failed to differentiate between approaches or activities. Previous meta-analyses have failed to differentiate between general parent involvement models (that focus on activities parents do) and family-school partnership models (that focus on relationships between family members and school personnel). There is a need to (a) differentiate between interventions that are relational in nature and strive to strengthen family-school partnerships, versus those that are structural in nature and attempt to promote parent involvement activities; and (b) identify the primary components that typify these approaches. The present review is a preliminary summary of studies that investigates the benefits of two clearly distinct approaches--i.e., interventions that are relational in nature and strive to strengthen family-school partnerships and those that are structural in nature and attempt to promote parent involvement activities. Coding scheme is appended. (Contains 5 figures and 3 tables.) [This paper was presented originally by the authors at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Psychological Association.]
Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 216 Mabel Lee Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588. Tel: 402-472-2448; Fax: 402-472-2298; Web site: http://www.cyfs.unl.edu
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Science Foundation; American Educational Research Association (AERA), Education Research Conferences Program
Authoring Institution: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools (CYFS)