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ERIC Number: ED537650
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 226
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2671-7085-9
ISSN: N/A
Organizational Commitment among Employees at a Private Nonprofit University in Virginia
Calland, David R.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the similarity between the human resource strategies (benefits, due process, employee participation, employee skill level, general training, job enrichment, social interactions, wages) currently utilized at a private, nonprofit university in Virginia, and those reported in the research conducted by J. M. Buck (1999) in public colleges and universities. This study also sought to determine differences in organizational commitment levels (affective, normative, continuance) as reported by the participants in the J. M. Buck (1999) study and the current study. The secondary purpose was to study the impact of job position (faculty/staff) on organizational commitment levels (affective, continuance, normative) of university employees at a private, nonprofit university. Three research questions were considered in this study. First, are the human resource strategies (benefits, due process, employee participation, employee skill level, general training, job enrichment, social interactions, wages) reported by the six colleges or universities included in the study by J. M. Buck (1999), as measured by the Survey of HRM Practices in Higher Education, similar to the human resource strategies (benefits, due process, employee participation, employee skill level, general training, job enrichment, social interactions, wages) reported by the organization included in the current study? Second, are there significant differences in organizational commitment levels reported by participants in the current study compared to the study by J. M. Buck (1999)? Third, are there significant differences in organizational commitment levels reported by participants depending on position level (faculty vs. staff) in the current study? Appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted to support the comparisons between the research samples. These analyses found the data collected from the Survey of HRM Practices in Higher Education indicated higher scores on benefits, due process, and general training in J. M. Buck's (1999) research. However, results were higher for the current study in the areas of employee participation, employee skill level, job enrichment, and social interaction. Significant mean differences were found in the dimensions of affective commitment. Statistically significant relationships were found between faculty and staff job positions and the affective and continuance dimensions of commitment. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Virginia