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ERIC Number: ED537567
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 155
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2671-2545-3
ISSN: N/A
The Perception Gap: Sociodemographic Factors Affecting Teacher Perceptions of Students in Urban Schools
Llamas, Joseph M.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
Two hundred and sixty two K-12 teachers, ranging from pre-service to experienced teachers, and from elementary to high school, were surveyed regarding their perceptions of students based on gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and behavior. Utilizing a five point scale that surveyed teachers' responses to narratives of student stereotypes commonly found on school campuses, the study investigated how student demographic factors intersected with the teachers' gender, ethnicity, and years of experience. The study determined that the student variables influenced the teachers' perceptions of students such that they tended to assign higher respect for students with specific sociodemographic characteristics. The study found that teachers' gender, experience, and ethnicity were important determinants of their respect for students. When investigating the effect of teacher gender, regression analysis confirmed that female teachers tended to have significantly higher respect for White students and White students with negative behavior. In exploring teacher classroom experience, the study found that teacher experience influenced their perceptions of students. While new teachers were prone to rate all student ethnicities higher than veteran teachers, they rated Asian students highest, regardless of SES. The study determined that teacher ethnicity was a significant factor in teachers' perceptions of students based on their gender, SES, ethnicity, and/or behavior. Students' ethnicity also influenced teachers' respect ratings. Teachers generally rated Asian students with negative behavior lowest. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A