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ERIC Number: ED537243
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Nov
Pages: 34
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 8
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Eastern Kentucky Teacher and Administrative Stress: Part III
Wright, Sam; Ballestero, Victor
Online Submission
The purpose of this research was to survey randomly selected Eastern Kentucky Superintendents to collect data about stress in public schools. This was the third year of a continuation study for Eastern Kentucky that collected data on how men and women teachers and men and women administrators handle stress. A stress survey (Appendix A) was sent to randomly selected school superintendents located in the Eastern Kentucky region serviced by Morehead State University (22 Counties, See Appendix D). The survey was conducted during the spring of 2012. The random survey resulted in an 80% return. The conclusions for the survey were: (1) A majority of the superintendents (75%) indicated men teachers handle stress the best. (2) A majority of the superintendents (90%) indicated men school administrators handle stress the best. (3) A majority of superintendents (50%) indicated high school teachers handle stress the best. (4) A majority of the superintendents (45%) indicated high school administrators handle stress the best. (5) A majority of superintendents (75%) felt enrollment makes a difference in the level of stress for teachers. (6) The superintendents (95%) felt enrollment makes a difference in the level of stress for school administrators. (7) A majority of the superintendents (90%) felt the financial condition of a school district makes a difference in the level of stress for teachers. (8) The superintendents unanimously (100%) felt the financial condition of a school district makes a difference in the level of stress for school administrators. (9) A majority of the superintendents (70%) felt age makes a difference in the level of stress for teachers. (10) A majority of the superintendents (70%) felt age makes a difference in the level of stress for school administrators. (11) The superintendents (65%) felt the 21-30 age group of teachers suffer the highest level of stress. (12) The superintendents (30%) felt school administrators in the 41-50 age group suffered the highest level of stress. (13) The superintendents unanimously indicated stress was increasing for teachers. (14) The superintendents unanimously indicated stress was increasing for school administrators. The results of the superintendent stress survey were compared to the previous two year surveys of principal and teacher stress surveys. Five appendices are included: (1) Eastern Kentucky Teacher and Administrative Stress Survey; (2) Letter to Superintendents; (3) Follow-up Letter to Superintendents; (4) Service Region for Morehead State University; and (5) Authors' Information. [For Part II, see ED529289.]
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; High Schools; Junior High Schools; Middle Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Kentucky