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ERIC Number: ED536012
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 149
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2670-6466-0
ISSN: N/A
Inquiry Learning: Students' Perception of Light Wave Phenomena in an Informal Environment
Ford, Ken
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College
This study involved identifying students' perception of light phenomena and determined if they learned the scientific concepts of light that were presented to them by an interactive science exhibit. The participants in this study made scientific inquiry about light by using a powerful white light source, a prism, converging lenses, diverging lenses, concave and convex mirrors in an informal science setting. The sample used in the study consisted of 40 subjects (15 males and 25 females) in a college program at a University located in the Southern region of the United States. The participants were selected using a convenient sampling process from a population enrolled in a pre-calculus class and a physics class. The participants were engaged in pretest on light wave phenomena using the Inquiry Laboratory Light Island exhibit. After the pretest, the participants were engaged in activities, where they reflected white light off the surface of concave and convex mirrors, refracted white light through converging and diverging lens, and passed white light through a prism. They also made observations of the behavior and characteristics of light from the patterns that it created. After three weeks, the participants were given the Inquiry Laboratory Light Island exhibit posttest. The findings of the study indicated that the means yielded a higher average for the participants' posttest scores. The t-Test results were statistically significant, which confirmed that the concepts of light wave phenomena were perceived and learned by the participants. The Inquiry Laboratory survey questions analyzed using the chi-square test suggested that participants were in agreement with the concepts about light. In addition, Cramer's phi and Cramer's V suggested a moderate relationship and association between the genders of the participants on the concepts of light wave phenomena. Furthermore, the interview and observation protocol processes confirmed that students perceived and learned the science concepts of light wave phenomena by the way they responded to the researcher's interview questions. Implications from the study suggested that further study be carried out on the learning process in an informal science setting and should be supported by corporations, businesses, educational institutions, and organizations. Although the findings from this study aided in the development of a structured approach that enhanced student motivation, interest, and learning about light waves in physics/physical science there is still a need to do more research in this area. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A