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ERIC Number: ED535754
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 267
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-2670-5913-0
ISSN: N/A
The Role of Faculty-Student Interactions in Student Leadership Development and Engagement Based on Varying Levels of Faculty Scholarship of Engagement
Sprow, Alicia Haberski
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Alvernia University
The purpose of this quantitative, causal-comparative research study using cross-sectional data was to compare groups of higher education institutions based on their level of scholarship of engagement across: (a) level of faculty-student interactions and (b) how the predictive value of faculty-student interactions compares among the three scholarship of engagement groups for student leadership development, student community engagement, and student institutional engagement. Secondary data from the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) 2004-2005 Faculty Survey was used first to establish groups of institutions according to their level of scholarship of engagement, which uses local community needs as the integrating context for the three main faculty responsibilities of teaching, research, and service. The faculty sample included 2,937 full-time faculty members from 70 different institutions of higher education. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed three groups of institutions based on faculty involvement in scholarship of engagement activities (low, medium, and high). Secondary data from the HERI 2004-2005 College Senior Survey (CSS) was then employed to examine differences among the three institutional groupings for faculty-student interactions and the predictive value of these interactions for student leadership development, student engagement with the local community, and student institutional engagement. The student sample included 9,589 full-time students from 67 different higher education institutions. A one-way ANOVA revealed that the High Scholarship of Engagement group had a significantly higher level of faculty-student interactions than the low and medium groups. Hierarchical multiple regression models were developed using Astin's (1991) I-E-O Model as a guide to examine the predictive value of faculty-student interactions for student leadership development, student community engagement, and student institutional engagement. The regression models included five blocks consisting of demographic characteristics, institutional characteristics, student leadership experiences during college, student community engagement experiences during college, and faculty-student interactions. The results indicated that for all three outcome variables, faculty-student interactions had the strongest predictive value in the High Scholarship of Engagement group. This suggests that institutions that are more engaged with their local communities may offer increased opportunities for faculty-student interactions with a community component that present students with greater opportunities to increase their leadership skills and their engagement to both their surrounding communities and to their institutions. These findings add to the existing body of literature by addressing the gap surrounding faculty-student interactions with a community-component and the role they play in enhancing students' leadership skills and increasing their community and institutional engagement. The Social Change Model of Leadership Development is a vehicle through which faculty-student interactions containing a community component can be implemented. It cuts across both the main independent variable in the current study, faculty-student interactions with a community component, and the three independent variables of student leadership development, student community engagement, and student institutional engagement. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A