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ERIC Number: ED535638
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Dec
Pages: 37
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
No Child Left Behind Waiver Applications: Are They Ambitious and Achievable?
Ayers, Jeremy
Center for American Progress
The Obama administration has offered states the chance to waive some requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act. States are required, however, to make specific reforms in exchange for increased flexibility. The administration has been clear it wants states to engage in "ambitious but achievable" reforms rather than merely asking for a pass from the law. Applications submitted for the first round of waivers by 11 states to get a feel for how ambitious and achievable they are were reviewed. In taking a qualitative snapshot of the applications, a few findings emerged: (1) Clarity of goals; (2) Clarity of school ratings; (3) Inclusion of subgroups; (4) Readiness to evaluate educators; and (5) Reduction of burden. Two aspects of state applications were then examined: their evaluation and accountability systems. From that review two states--Tennessee and Massachusetts--"stand out" for articulating clear and challenging goals, proposing focused school-rating systems, and having data infrastructure that will help them implement evaluation systems. This report outlines what states must submit in their applications and summarizes some key elements of what states proposed or did not propose. The report concludes with findings that span the applications and recommendations for the Department of Education. Appended are: (1) Flexibility from No Child Left Behind requirements; and (2) Reforms required to receive flexibility. (Contains 2 charts and 24 endnotes.)
Center for American Progress. 1333 H Street NW 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 202-682-1611; Web site: http://www.americanprogress.org
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Center for American Progress