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ERIC Number: ED535442
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Sep
Pages: 122
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
"E Pluribus"... Separation: Deepening Double Segregation for More Students
Orfield, Gary; Kucsera, John; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve
Civil Rights Project / Proyecto Derechos Civiles
This report shows segregation has increased dramatically across the country for Latino students, who are attending more intensely segregated and impoverished schools than they have for generations. The segregation increases have been the most dramatic in the West. The typical Latino student in the region attends a school where less than a quarter of their classmates are white; nearly two-thirds are other Latinos; and two-thirds are poor. California, New York and Texas, all states that have been profoundly altered by immigration trends over the last half-century, are among the most segregated states for Latino students along multiple dimensions. In this report, the authors summarize the most rigorous research to date showing that segregated schools are systematically linked to unequal educational opportunities. Using data from the National Center on Education Statistics, the authors explore how enrollment shifts and segregation trends are playing out nationally, as well as in regions, states and metropolitan areas. This report suggests a number of specific ways to reverse the trends toward deepening resegregation and educational inequalities. Two related but smaller reports provide a special focus on the South and the West, the two most racially diverse regions in the country. Appended are: (1) Additional Data Tables; and (2) Data Sources and Methodology. Individual sections contain footnotes. (Contains 5 figures and 36 tables.)
Civil Rights Project / Proyecto Derechos Civiles. 8370 Math Sciences, P.O. Box 951521, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1521. Tel: 310-267-5562; Fax: 310-206-6293; e-mail: crp@ucla.edu; Web site: http://www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: University of California, Los Angeles, Civil Rights Project / Proyecto Derechos Civiles
IES Cited: ED560723