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ERIC Number: ED535159
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 119
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1095-4390-2
ISSN: N/A
Criminal Justice Education: Investigation of Retention, Self-Efficacy, and Teaching Style in College Based versus Law Enforcement Academies
Drummond, Frank J.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
The purpose of this study was to investigate measures of retention, self-efficacy, and teaching style in a college based law enforcement program versus an agency based law enforcement academy on the west coast through survey methods. A total of 35 law enforcement based academy instructors (i.e., Modesto) and 30 college based academy instructors (i.e., Delta) completed surveys. Teachers in the Delta cohort had a higher average self-efficacy (x = 35.0) compared with the Modesto cohort (x = 31.2) as measured by the GSE scale. Teachers in the Delta cohort had higher average teaching style ratings compared with the Modesto cohort for all styles (e.g., Facilitator, Delegator, Personal Model, Expert, and Formal Authority) as measured by the Grasha-Riechmann Teaching Style survey. Modesto retention rates (2007 = 74.1%, 2008 = 69.2%, 2009 = 63.8%) were lower than Delta retention rates (2007 = 74.6%, 2008 = 71.6%, 2009 = 67.7%). There were no statistically significant relationships between police recruit retention rates and teacher self-efficacy scores for either the Delta or Modesto cohorts. There were no statistically significant differences in between police recruit retention rates and teaching style ratings for either the Delta or Modesto cohorts. The only statistically significant finding involved MANOVA statistical analysis that determined differences in retention rates, self-efficacy scores, and teaching style ratings that were all higher for the Delta cohort compared to the Modesto cohort with less than a 5% chance for Type I error. There were also some statistically significant and positive relationships between self-efficacy scores and higher teaching style ratings among both cohorts detailed in Chapter 5. The study results are therefore meaningful and applicable to the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training and related stakeholders (e.g., police chiefs/law enforcement academy directors, teachers, and public citizens) from which to improve police recruit retention rates in both law enforcement training programs. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Adult Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California