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ERIC Number: ED534188
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 187
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1249-0071-1
ISSN: N/A
The Forces That Shape the Work of Community College Counselors
Ryan, Edward Francis
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
Concerns exist about the quality of counseling within community colleges. Some counselors lower student aspirations and are inaccessible, uninformed, or discouraging. Evidence also suggests that ineffective counseling might be explained by role conflict. Although role conflict should not be used as an excuse to justify poor performance, it may help explain counselor behavior. I conducted this study to examine how role conflict shapes counselors' work and to understand the forces that contribute to role conflict. To help conceptualize this study, I borrowed from the literature on role theory, of which role conflict is a component. As part of this study, I examined four overarching research questions: 1. What do counselors see as their role within the community college? 2. What forces shape the counseling role? 3. How do these forces affect counselor's work? 4. How do counselors negotiate the multiple forces they encounter? I conducted in-depth interviews as they offered an opportunity to explore participants' lived experiences. The interview process allowed me to understand how counselors view their work as well as the forces that shape their work. The protocol was semi-structured and consisted of open-ended questions. Through this study, I found that key forces such as funding, institutional mission, student demand, space, and information significantly influence the work of counselors and the delivery of services. Uncovering this information is useful as it demonstrates that powerful external forces impinge upon counselors' work. With this information, policymakers can work to improve the delivery of counseling services. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A