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ERIC Number: ED534108
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 145
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1248-3786-4
ISSN: N/A
Community College Presidents' Core Internal Metaphors
DeBraak, LaRonna S.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Colorado State University
This study identified the core internal metaphors of 8 community college presidents, 4 females and 4 males. The participants of this study resided in both rural and metropolitan communities. Core internal metaphors were adopted due to a strong association to a primary conceptual metaphor, which the participants had internalized as a result of their perceptions of historical associations, events, ideas, and values. Each participant's core internal metaphor was identified by thematic coding of narrations in order to answer two questions: (1) What are community college presidents' core internal metaphors? and (2) What is the relationship between described leadership and the core internal metaphors? Attention was paid to how participants' word choices and actions were directly associated to core internal metaphors in the various narrations. Findings indicated that core internal metaphors were symbolic, illustrative, and pictographic internalizations that affected the presidents' internal and external environments. Females' core internal metaphors were: biologist as an organism residing in the laboratory, equestrian, army general, and enlightened traveler. Males' core internal metaphors were: gardener, progressive and strategic opportunist, advocate for social equality and opportunity, and squadron commander. Core internal metaphors are highly idiosyncratic in nature, meaning they became a unique and distinctive characteristic of the individual. They serve the purpose of providing the individual with a distinct lens through which to view and participate in the world. Individuals' memories of events served as a catalyst for the adoption of their core internal metaphors. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A