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ERIC Number: ED533902
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 78
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1248-8254-3
ISSN: N/A
Grade Retention: An Exploration of the Pedagogical Experiences and Attitudes of Elementary Principals that Influence Decisions to Retain Students in a Grade
DelConte, Jill
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Seton Hall University
For decades there has been an on-going debate regarding whether or not retention is the best strategy to use for students who are not meeting academic success--whether determined by a test, grades, or standards. Much of the research has indicated that little is gained academically over time by retaining students, but even more significant are the claims that retention has serious negative consequences for a students emotional and social well-being. If that is the case, why then do principals continue to support the practice of retaining students? This question was the basis for this study, which was to determine the factors that contribute to the grade retention decision-making of principals as reflected by a survey shared with the elementary principals in Gloucester County and Camden County, in New Jersey. This study explored the demographic information, experiences, and beliefs that principals have toward the practice of retaining students, relative to specific designations of struggling learners. The survey, Grade Retention Decision-Making Survey (GRDMS), used in this study was derived from the Principals and Inclusion Survey (PIS) developed by Praisner (2003), based on how decisions are made by principals regarding inclusion in special education. The overall results of the GRDMS indicate that there is a negative attitude toward the practice of retaining students. It is a shared belief of the survey participants that effective teachers, instructional strategies, and funding should be made available to support struggling learners in an effort to avoid using retention as an intervention strategy. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: New Jersey