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ERIC Number: ED533196
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 176
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1248-1683-8
ISSN: N/A
Vocabulary Acquisition in Learning English as a Second Language: Examining the Involvement Load Hypothesis and Language Anxiety with Taiwanese College Students
Cheng, Hsin-Chia
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Northern Colorado
The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on Taiwanese students' English vocabulary retention, task difficulty ratings, and task utility ratings under varied task load conditions (reading only, fill-in-the-blanks, writing) when controlling for level of trait anxiety. The task loads were based on the Involvement Load Hypothesis. The effects of task load on state anxiety were also examined. The participants in this study were 111 Taiwanese students, who were not English majors, from three English classes taught by the same teacher and using the same textbook at a university located in Northern Taiwan. The research findings included the following: students in the reading only group (with the lowest task load) generated higher vocabulary retention than the fill-in-the-blanks group (with a medium task load) when controlling for trait anxiety; after the learning tasks were completed, all students reported reduced state anxiety; the reading only group, which had the lowest task load, reported the highest difficulty ratings; students did not report higher utility ratings in higher task load conditions compared to lower ones when controlling for trait anxiety. One implication of this study is that the Involvement Load Hypothesis was able to distinguish between the lowest and highest load tasks, but did not adequately describe the moderate task. Further research should examine this and either revise or expand the model for more precision. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Taiwan