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ERIC Number: ED532045
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 189
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1095-5509-7
ISSN: N/A
An Exploratory Study of the Relationship between Elementary Principals' Perceptions of Their Leadership Behaviors and the Impact on One Year of Reading Achievement Scores
Smith, Debra
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University
The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between principals' perceptions of their learning-centered leadership behaviors and one year of reading achievement scores. Perceptions of principals were gathered from 31 out of 42 elementary schools in a district located in Central Virginia. This study explored the relationship between elementary school principals' perceptions of their instructional leadership, and school achievement as measured by scores on the third, fourth and fifth grade Standards Of Learning (SOL) Reading test. Data collection on principals' perceptions of their learning-centered leadership was performed using the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-ED). VAL-ED is aligned with the revised Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC, 2008) standards and grounded in research connecting principal leadership and student learning. VAL-ED measures leadership behaviors on six core components of effective schools and the key practices that influence student achievement using a 5-point Likert scale. The following research questions were used to guide this study: (a) What leadership behaviors of principals, as measured by the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-ED), are identified as having an effect on third, fourth, and fifth grade reading achievement? (b) Do the perceptions of principals regarding leadership practices in elementary schools, as measured on VAL-ED, vary by gender, years of experience, size of the school or school SES? (c) How much variance in third, fourth, and fifth grade reading scores can be explained by principals' perceptions of leadership behaviors on the VAL-ED survey? Findings indicated (a) a positive correlation existed between principals' perceptions of the existence of core components and measures of student reading achievement (SOL mean reading scores and SOL reading pass rates) and (b) a positive correlation existed between principals' perceptions of their effectiveness in employing key processes and measures of student reading achievement (SOL mean reading scores and SOL reading pass rates). Further findings indicated that the perceptions of principals regarding leadership practices in elementary schools did not vary by gender, years of experience, size of school, or school SES. Finally it was determined that rigorous curriculum (5.8% to 9.6%) and performance accountability (6.5% to 7.0%) accounted for significant variance in mean reading scores. Overall findings suggested that principals, who planned for and focused on rigorous curriculum and performance accountability, facilitated instructional improvements and academic achievement. Although all schools in this district maintained at least a pass-proficient rating, the richness of the results lie in the findings that several acknowledgement that several schools with higher SES indicators were able to maintain pass/advanced rankings. These findings paralleled findings from Edmond's (1979) effective schools' research, which developed the notion that schools do make a difference. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Grade 3; Grade 4; Grade 5
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Virginia