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ERIC Number: ED530766
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 153
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1246-7892-4
ISSN: N/A
Cross Sectional Study of Agile Software Development Methods and Project Performance
Lambert, Tracy
ProQuest LLC, D.B.A. Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University
Agile software development methods, characterized by delivering customer value via incremental and iterative time-boxed development processes, have moved into the mainstream of the Information Technology (IT) industry. However, despite a growing body of research which suggests that a predictive manufacturing approach, with big up-front specifications, detailed estimates, and speculative plans applicable to manufacturing domains, is the wrong paradigm for software development, many IT organizations are still hesitant to adopt agile approaches (Larman, 2004). This study extends research based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003) into the domain of business processes. Specifically, processes related to the 'behavioral intent' to adopt agile software development methods. Further, it investigated relationships between adoption and the impact on project performance attributes. A sample was obtained from a population of IT practitioners from within the IT industry. The sampling frame consisted of members from the global Software Process Improvement Network (SPIN) chapters, Agile User Groups, and I.T. industry conference promoters and presenters. Independent variables included performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, and facilitating conditions, with the dependant variable being behavioral intent to adopt agile software development methods. The independent variable of agile software development adoption and dependent variables of project performance were also included as well as predictive models relating adoption to on-time delivery of project functionality and stakeholder satisfaction. The variables in the study were measured via a 65-item questionnaire based on previous scales, and tested to ensure validity and reliability. The research questions were developed to identify correlations between performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, and the behavioral intent to adopt agile software development methods. Additional questions measured the correlation between adoption and key project performance attributes. The research found positive correlations between performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, and behavioral intent to adopt agile software development methods, positive correlations between adoption and on-time delivery of project functionality and stakeholder satisfaction, and weak positive correlations with post delivery defects and project success rates. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A