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ERIC Number: ED527409
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2008
Pages: 104
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1241-4313-2
ISSN: N/A
Perceptions of Special Educators for Teaching Self-Determination to Students with Significant Disabilities
Dubberly, Russell
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University
This applied dissertation was designed to provide this school district with a better understanding of the perceptions of special education teachers who teach students with significant disabilities about self-determination. A survey was distributed to collect data about teachers' perceptions of self-determination skills taught to students, self-determination skills perceived as used by students, and skills perceived as important for students, as well as skills considered beneficial to students during school and after graduation. The survey also attempted to correlate the significance of variables for teachers' job settings; job responsibilities; student caseloads; teaching experience; degree earned; licensure; and self-determination training with variables of self-determination usage, self-determination benefit to students, and importance of self-determination. The data indicated that teachers perceived self-determination to be important for their students with significant disabilities, somewhat beneficial, but perceived their students usage of self-determination less favorably. A statistically significant correlation was found between teachers' (a) job responsibilities, (b) degree earned, (c) teaching experience, and (d) the amount of self-determination training reported by a teacher and perceptions of student usage for self-determination. Further empirical research was recommended as a compliment to this study to better understand the relationship of the variables previously mentioned. The writer also recommends that research that includes the perspective of regular education teachers should be conducted with this district's movement to inclusive educational settings for students with disabilities. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A