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ERIC Number: ED526721
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 222
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1245-0371-4
ISSN: N/A
How Students Make Sense of and Respond to Messages about Information in Higher Education
Mark, Amy E.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Mississippi
As critical thinking, student-centered learning, and assessment have become essential to the mission of institutions of higher education, librarians are increasingly challenged to assist the university in meeting these goals by teaching information literacy. Information seeking behavior of students has been studied as faculty and librarians attempt to implement information literacy standards and seek to improve student research and writing skills. The purpose of this case study is to explore how students make sense of and respond to messages about information in higher education. This study identifies the messages students in higher education receive about information gathering, conducting research, and the credibility and authority of information sources. Research to date focuses on how to steer students to information privileged by the academy: academic, peer reviewed articles, and books. The voice of students is often absent. This study employs the critical framework of Paulo Freire in order to give voice to student perceptions of information. The significance of this study to scholarly research is threefold. First, this exploration provides a framework for librarians to work with students to implement information literacy standards. Second, this research contributes to education literature on student-centered learning. Third, understanding how students make sense of and apply information provides direction for education policy makers. The audience for this study has a wide base that includes faculty, students, and administrators. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States