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ERIC Number: ED525906
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 113
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1244-9503-3
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Attitude toward Black English and Its Impact on Reading Achievement
Lawson, Evelyn Roshonn
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Texas A&M University - Commerce
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between teacher attitude toward Black English and student achievement in reading. For this study, 61 teachers of reading or English/Language Arts in grades 3-6 were surveyed. These teachers, whose informed consent letters indicated a willingness to participate, were selected from 17 different schools. Data desired for this study included responses on the Language Attitude Survey (LAS), demographic information for each teacher who completed the survey, interviews for six teacher volunteers who agreed to participate on their consent form, and Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) reading scores for 3rd-6th grade students who speak Black English in the classroom. The LAS was scored based on three constructs. Teachers' scores were placed into three groups denoting positive, neutral, or negative attitude toward Black English. A MANOVA was used to assess teachers' attitude toward Black English as measured by the LAS. Three constructs of the LAS were used as the dependent variables: structure and inherent usefulness of Black English, consequences of using and accepting Black English in the educational setting, and philosophies concerning the use and acceptance of Black English. Teacher demographics including teachers' gender, years of teaching experience, age, and whether the teacher had formal linguistics training were used as independent variables. These independent variables were analyzed separately in individual MANOVAs. Results showed that when analyzing teacher attitudes and teacher characteristics, there was not a statistically significant difference by gender, years of teaching experience, age, or participation in a formal linguistics class and teacher attitude toward Black English. Ethnicity was not analyzed because of the high percentage of teachers in this study who were African American. Next, a multiple regression was run to determine the relationship between teacher attitude toward students who speak Black English and reading achievement. The three constructs on the LAS used as predictor variables included structure and inherent usefulness of Black English, consequences of using and accepting Black English in the educational setting, and philosophies concerning the use and acceptance of Black English. TAKS scores were used as the dependent variable. Teacher attitude toward Black English was a not a statistically significant predictor of student reading achievement as measured by the Reading TAKS test in grades 3-6. The constant comparative data analysis technique (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) was used to analyze qualitative data. Four themes emerged. Teachers had positive perceptions toward students who use Black English in the classroom. Teachers believed that environmental factors were crucial determinants in whether or not students used Black English. Teachers used indirect teaching strategies to deal with students who use Black English in the classroom. Also, teachers felt that students who speak Black English would face future problems in job and educational accomplishment as well as social issues because of their limited communication skills. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Grade 3; Grade 4; Grade 5; Grade 6
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Texas