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ERIC Number: ED525470
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 219
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1244-9517-0
ISSN: N/A
Urban Elementary Teachers' Negotiation of School Culture and the Fostering of Educational Resilience
Geste, Audrey Jane
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Research about educational resilience provides a framework for understanding why some at risk children are successful in school, while others are not. It can inform and guide teachers as they strive to improve the odds of urban student achievement. This research, an instrumental multiple case study, gathered the experiences of three experienced elementary teachers of fourth grade at one high poverty urban school. Multiple data sources, including a questionnaire, documents, a series of interviews, and field observations were collected and analyzed using thematic analysis techniques within a cultural studies approach. A social constructionist lens informs the theoretical framework that underpins this research study that incorporates aspects of Bourdieu's (1977) theory of power and practice and the study of educational resilience. This study examined how the socio-cultural divide between urban students and schools is mediated by teachers, exploring teachers' beliefs about success and resilience, and determined the subsequent ways in which resilience building strategies were employed. Analysis of the data reveals that how elementary teachers in urban schools negotiate the socio-cultural divide between school and home impacts the provision of environments that promote and sustain urban student success and resilience. The participant teachers' lived experiences as elementary urban educators provide insight into the attitudes and processes that can reconcile many of the challenges evident in urban educational contexts. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A