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ERIC Number: ED525163
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 191
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1242-0047-7
ISSN: N/A
An Examination of South Carolina School Boards' Effectiveness and Its Influence on Student Achievement
Conner, Marty S.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, South Carolina State University
In the era of school accountability, school boards are under scrutiny for their effectiveness in improving student achievement. It has become more than obvious that school boards play an important role in the effectiveness, ineffectiveness, successes and failures of school districts. However, to what degree of importance was the premise for this study? The purpose of this study was to analyze the following questions regarding school board effectiveness and student achievement: (1) What are effective school boards? (2) Based on Eugene Smoley's board effectiveness model, what are the most used effectiveness strategies that exist between high, average, and low effective boards and all the school boards studied? (3) How does school board effectiveness positively or negatively influence the achievement of students as measured by the South Carolina 2008 District Report Card? (4) How do school board members' and superintendents' years of service, relationships, and their perceived roles impact student achievement? (5) Are school boards' effectiveness different in urban, suburban, and rural districts? The results of this study determined: (1) there was no significant difference [F (1, 52 = 0.96, p = 0.33)] between student achievement as measured by South Carolina 2008 District Report Cards as it relates to school board degree of effectiveness. The null hypothesis was retained at the p less than 0.05 level of significance. (2) When examining school board members' degree of effectiveness by school district type (urban, suburban, and rural), the results yielded no significant difference in the degree of effectiveness regarding school district type. The analysis of variance model [F (2, 53 = 0.88, p = 0.42)] of school board effectiveness as it related to school district type (urban, suburban, and rural) was not significant at the p less than 0.05 level of significance. The null hypothesis was retained. (3) The results indicated that there was no significant difference [F (2, 51 = 02.42, p = 0.10)] in school board members' degree of effectiveness as it relates to superintendent's years of service in the district. The research hypothesis was not significant at the p less than 0.05 level, retaining the null hypothesis; (4) the results indicated there was no significant difference [F (1, 52 = 0.96, p = 0.33)] in school board members' degree of effectiveness as it relates to school board members years of service as a school board member. The null hypothesis was retained at the p less than 0.05 level of significance; (5) based on Eugene Smoley's school board effectiveness model, the "working toward board improvement" was the highest effectiveness strategy used by all school boards. The least used effectiveness strategy used by all school boards was "functioning as a group" (z = -0.20). "Connecting to the community" (z = 0.12) was the average effectiveness strategy that all school boards utilized. The results of this study determined that 37.5% of the school boards studied revealed that effectiveness did align to student achievement; while the remaining 62.5% of school boards studied revealed effectiveness was not positively or negatively aligned to their student achievement ratings. This study revealed that current research on school board effectiveness and its influence on student achievement is limited. The foremost problem is that few qualitative and quantitative data rich studies exist. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: South Carolina