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ERIC Number: ED523941
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 248
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1243-7151-1
ISSN: N/A
Doctoral Students? Perceptions of Learning in a Blended Research Methods Course: Three Telling Cases
Smith, Sedef Uzuner
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, State University of New York at Albany
As Walker, Golde, Jones, Bueschel, and Hutchings (2008) state, research is "the sine qua non of the doctorate" (p. 4). Therefore, equipping students with the knowledge and skills to conduct research is a key priority in doctoral education. Blended instruction is a promising, yet so far seldom used model for supporting doctoral students' learning and research training. This model includes a combination of traditional face-to-face (FTF) instruction with Web-based online approaches. This phenomenological case study attempts to answer two questions regarding doctoral students' perceptions of learning in a research methods course that used blended instruction: (1) How do doctoral students perceive their learning developing through the interactions and activities taking place in the FTF and online components of a blended research methods course? (2) How do their lived experiences shape their interactions, engagement, and participation in the course? The study seeks to provide an in-depth look at these questions by considering the cases of three doctoral students. Notions of community of practice and legitimate peripheral participation (Lave & Wenger, 1991, Wenger, 1998) and activity theory (Engestrom, 1987, 1993, 2001; Roth, 2007, 2009) provided the theoretical lens for this study. Data included in-depth interviews with the participants, fieldnotes made during observations of the FTF sessions, and documentary data, including the course syllabus and online transcripts. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A