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ERIC Number: ED523821
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Sep
Pages: 45
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 5
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Beginning Teacher Attrition and Mobility: Results from the First through Third Waves of the 2007-08 Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study. First Look. NCES 2011-318
Kaiser, Ashley
National Center for Education Statistics
While the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has conducted surveys of attrition and mobility among school teachers for two decades, little was known specifically about the early career patterns of beginning teachers. In order to inform discussions and decisions among policymakers, researchers, and parents, the Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study (BTLS), sponsored by NCES of the Institute of Education Sciences within the U.S. Department of Education, was initiated as a longitudinal study of public school teachers who began teaching in 2007 or 2008. This report is a first look at data from the first three waves of data collection. The purpose of this report is to introduce new NCES data through the presentation of tables containing descriptive information. Only selected findings are presented and not all differences in the tables are discussed in the text. Selected findings include: (1) Of the teachers who began teaching in public schools in 2007 or 2008, about 10 percent were not teaching in 2008-09, and 12 percent were not teaching in 2009-10 (table 1); (2) Among beginning public school teachers who were assigned a mentor in 2007-08, about 8 percent were not teaching in 2008-09 and 10 percent were not teaching in 2009-10. In contrast, among the beginning public school teachers who were not assigned a mentor in 2007-08, about 16 percent were not teaching in 2008-09 and 23 percent were not teaching in 2009-10 (table 2); (3) Approximately 93 percent of beginning public school teachers who were earning less than $40,000 in 2008-09 remained teachers in 2009-10, and about 96 percent of beginning public school teachers who were earning $40,000 or more in 2008-09 remained teachers in 2009-10 (table 3); (4) Of the beginning public school teachers, about 74 percent were teaching in the same school in 2009-10 as in the previous school year (stayers), about 10 percent were teaching in a different school in 2009-10 than the previous school year (movers), about 3 percent had returned to teaching in 2009-10 after a year of not teaching (returners), and about 12 percent were not teaching in 2009-10 (table 4); and (5) Approximately 21 percent of 2008-09 movers and 27 percent of 2009-10 movers moved across schools because their contract was not renewed. About 31 percent of 2008-09 leavers and 35 percent of 2009-10 leavers left the teaching profession because their contract was not renewed (table 5). Appended are: (1) Standard Error Tables; (2) Methodology and Technical Notes; and (3) Description of Variables. (Contains 14 tables, 1 exhibit and 7 footnotes.)
National Center for Education Statistics. Available from: ED Pubs. P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827; Web site: http://nces.ed.gov/
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Center for Education Statistics (ED)
Identifiers - Location: United States
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Schools and Staffing Survey (NCES)
IES Funded: Yes
IES Cited: ED544179